Girl Scouts host ‘Thinking Day’

By Jessica Ciparelli - ReminderNews
Ellington - posted Fri., Mar. 4, 2011
Emily, 7, and Emma, 6, both first-graders at Crystal Lake and members of Daisy Troop 10781, string special necklaces that had beads featuring each of the 14 countries. Photos by Jessica Ciparelli.
Emily, 7, and Emma, 6, both first-graders at Crystal Lake and members of Daisy Troop 10781, string special necklaces that had beads featuring each of the 14 countries. Photos by Jessica Ciparelli.

Around the world in two hours. It might seem like a long trip, but the Ellington Girl Scouts didn’t mind – not when they got to learn about 14 countries and taste churros, tea from Wales, Irish Colcannon and Australian banana treats, play games like the Finnish “crab tag” and make South Korean paper kites. It was all part of “Thinking Day;” an event brought back last year after taking a 14-year hiatus.

“Doing this type of event will get the girls to learn about different countries and about Scouting or ‘girl guiding’ in other countries,” said Chris Keune, co-service unit manager and co-chair of Thinking Day. Each troop had a display of their chosen country, explaining what Girl Scouting is like in that country. Each troop also had to make a food, a craft or teach others how to play a game.

“We all had different parts – I did culture,” said Jenna, 11, a sixth-grader at Windermere, whose Cadette Troop 10750 was tasked with learning about Australia. “They made penicillin, aspirin and boomerangs. They made the first disposable syringes, wine casks, notepads and pacemakers.”

Each of the 14 troops had a reason for picking their particular country.

“We chose South Korea, because two sisters in the troop are from South Korea,” said Jen Olender, co-leader of Junior Troop 10757. The girls’ parents were professors in South Korea and came to the U.S. on sabbatical to study for a year, Olender said. Before the family left, they left chopsticks, keychains and the troop displayed South Korean wrapping paper. “Our troop voted to do South Korea because we miss them,” she said.

Daisy Troop 10725 put all the girls’ nationalities into a hat and picked one. They went with Wales.
“It’s at the southwest tip of the United Kingdom,” said Carol Feindel, co-leader of Daisy Troop 10725. “Daisies in Wales are called ‘Rainbows.’ They loved that Wales is the land of castles.”

What’s the best thing Brownie Troop 10680 learned about Mexico? “I think it was the traditions,” said Center School third-grader Lauren, 9, a Brownie.


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