Science fair a big hit at Hebron Elementary

By Melanie Savage - Staff Writer
Hebron - posted Tue., Apr. 5, 2011
Sixth-grader C.J. Yopp makes adjustments to his project, while classmate Doug looks on. Yopp's project involved dry ice, water and soap bubbles. Photos by Melanie Savage.
Sixth-grader C.J. Yopp makes adjustments to his project, while classmate Doug looks on. Yopp's project involved dry ice, water and soap bubbles. Photos by Melanie Savage.

Sixth-grader Nicholas D’Onofrio has an interest in tsunamis. “He was fascinated by tsunamis way before the Japan tsunami,” said D’Onofrio’s mom, Deborah, at the annual Hebron Elementary School Science Fair. The fair was sponsored by the Hebron PTA on April 1. D’Onofrio’s project, constructed with his partner, fellow sixth-grader Jacob Raimondo, was a plexiglass tank which demonstrated the effects of a tsunami on two Monopoly-building “villages.” D’Onofrio explained that the two different sides demonstrated the effects of the slope of the land. Less slope between shoreline and populated areas means more devastation by the water. “That’s why Japan gets so many tsunamis,” said D’Onofrio. “Same with Hawaii.”

A popular exhibit was the project of fifth-grader Sarah Aissis and her sixth-grade partner, Peter Ludwig. The pair’s project investigated the formation of eggs, and how they hatch. Serving as visual aids were live chicks and ducklings, which were quite a hit with many of the visitors. “These are Peter’s chickens,” explained Aissis, holding an extremely calm young rooster in her arms.

Fourth-grader Dan Mullaney constructed a gadget that formed mini-tornadoes. A computer fan generated the vortex, with the mist from a humidifier and specialized lighting making it visible. “My friend did something like this last year,” said Mullaney. “It inspired me to do a better one.” Mullaney’s gadget was accompanied by a display featuring information on hurricanes, including storms recorded in Connecticut. “The biggest one we’ve had was a four on the F-scale,” he said. The hurricane occurred in New Haven and, according to Mullaney’s display, it produced winds of between 207 and 260 miles per hour and was capable of leveling structures.

Another popular exhibit belonged to sixth-grader C.J. Yopp. It featured water, dry ice, and a soap solution. When dry ice was placed into the jar of water, a hose extending from the side allowed the vapor to escape into a bubble of soap. Visitors with protective gloves could then hold a bubble filled with water vapor, essentially holding a cloud in their hands. The exhibit became even more interesting when the pressure inside the jar accidentally built up, sending the lid across the room with a very loud “pop.”

“Awesome!” exclaimed the group of fifth- and sixth-grade boys surrounding the table.


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