Historic Phelps-Hathaway House to be part of attic tour series

By Gregory A. Scibelli - Staff Writer
Suffield - posted Thu., May. 19, 2011
One room in the attic of the Phelps-Hathaway House in Suffield. This room displays several trunks and other storage items used by the Hathaways in the 18th and 19th century. Photos by Gregory A. Scibelli.
One room in the attic of the Phelps-Hathaway House in Suffield. This room displays several trunks and other storage items used by the Hathaways in the 18th and 19th century. Photos by Gregory A. Scibelli.

The Phelps-Hathaway House, one of Suffield’s most historic homes, will be the site of the first-ever Attic Series Tour, with the first part of the series beginning on June 4.

The more than 200-year-old attic has long been one of the main attractions at the home, and now Connecticut Landmarks will be doing a specific viewing of the attic and the history it has to offer. On the first Saturday of each month from June through September, the Phelps-Hathaway staff will present a “behind-the-scenes tour.”

Tours of the attic have been going on for many years, and the house staff will be conducting regular tours from May 28 to Oct. 9. The tours are held on weekend days from 1to 4 p.m. and cost $7 for adults, $6 for students, teachers and seniors, and $4 for children ages 6 to 18. Children under 6 and Connecticut Landmarks members are admitted free of charge. There are also deals for group tours.

The tours have been presented by the Antiquarian and Landmarks Society of Connecticut, which owns the Phelps-Hathaway House.

Guests can view some of the objects that the Hathaway family saved from the 18th to mid-19th century. In fact, Suffield Historical Society member Michele Holcumbe said that there is a comparison between the house in the attic in what it features.

“It’s like pre-revolution versus post-revolution,” said Holcumbe, who has also led tours of the house.

The attic tour also looked into some of the nooks of the seemingly clean and well-preserved upstairs area that even featured some games and toys used by the Hathaway family in the early 19th century.

The house is very deceiving in size, but is very spacious, especially in the attic. The house is described as one of the most important buildings of its time in New England. It features unique architecture from the 18th century. It was owned by the Hathaway family throughout the 1800s. The Hathaway family was responsible for collecting the artifacts that visitors can see in the attic.

For more information on the tours, visit www.ctlandmarks.org.


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