Candlelight vigil and poetry reading held at ACC to remember Sept. 11

By Jennifer Holloway - Staff Writer
Enfield - posted Thu., Sep. 15, 2011
Allie Moran and Bianca Cartsounis participated in Asnuntuck's candlelight vigil to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. Photos by Jennifer Holloway.
Allie Moran and Bianca Cartsounis participated in Asnuntuck's candlelight vigil to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. Photos by Jennifer Holloway.

While the town of Enfield commemorated the 10-year anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks with a parade and unveiling of two beams salvaged from the World Trade Center, students and faculty at Asnuntuck Community College held a much smaller ceremony the day after the anniversary.

Beginning in 2002, the college has held a Poetry for Peace reading to remember Sept. 11, and sometime after, a candlelight vigil was added. For the 10th anniversary, both traditions continued with a group of about 30 people gathering in front of the school, silently holding candles in memory of those who died during the attacks. They ended their time by singing, “Let There Be Peace on Earth.”

Some in attendance spent their time thinking about the victims and their families.

“An ambulance passed by [during the vigil], and I thought how horrible it must have been,” said Bianca Cartsounis. “This puts life in perspective,” she added.

Christina Vernon said she was thinking about peace in general. “It’s what I wish for all mankind,” she said.

Afterwards, many went inside for the poetry reading. Edwina Trentham teaches poetry and edits the college’s poetry magazine. She started the event after noticing the poetry against war movement that began following Sept. 11.

“[The reading] seemed natural with the idea of peace and bringing the troops home safely,” she said. “They’re part of the college culture now.”

Some people recited their own works or read from other poets. Trentham also provided several books and folders of material with works related to peace.

Richard Smith opened the reading with a poem he wrote, titled “A War for Greed.” It ended with the words, “True peace may only come to be a fleeting fantasy.”

Readings at the 10th anniversary program varied from the lyrics of a Bob Dylan song to poems written about previous wars, to “Hug O’ War” by Shel Silverstein.

Another reading is held each March to mark the anniversary of the start of the war in Iraq.

 


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