Author talks about the role of ghosts in literature

By Kevin Hotary - Staff Writer
Colchester - posted Tue., Nov. 8, 2011
Author Eleanor Sullo talked about ghosts in literature during a recent visit to Cragin Library. Photos by Kevin Hotary.
Author Eleanor Sullo talked about ghosts in literature during a recent visit to Cragin Library. Photos by Kevin Hotary.

Just in time for Halloween, Eleanor Sullo, author of the “Menopause Murders” series and “Moonrakers,” among numerous other novels, paid a visit to the Cragin Library to discuss the role of the supernatural in literature, as well as some of her own ghostly encounters.

Starting with a list of titles suggested by audience members, Sullo talked about some of the many reasons that authors include ghosts in their stories, saying that it “would leave a big gap in world literature, in my opinion, if you took ghosts out of stories,” citing “Hamlet” as an example.

“Ghosts give us the sense that they can pierce the veil of immortality,” said Sullo. They allow the reader to perceive some sort of afterlife, and tell us something about our future. Ghosts also “expand the limits of our imaginations,” said Sullo, and give us a release from the trials and tribulations of everyday life.

Sullo talked about her time at Chambercombe Manor in Devon, England, which is reputed to be one of the most haunted homes in the country. After experiencing a number of unexplainable phenomena in the manor, including nightly noises from a secret room and cold spots on hot summer days, Sullo included the manor in her most recent novel.

“All of these things kept pressing me to make sense of the story. It’s my story, but it’s their story,” she said.

 


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