Scouts deliver holiday cheer

By Steve Smith - Staff Writer
Ellington/Enfield - posted Thu., Dec. 15, 2011
Cub Scouts (l-r) Cameron Race, Roger Mandeville and Tyler Richards sing carols to resident of Blair Manor in Enfield, along with the rest of Pack77's Den #1, on Dec. 11. Photos by Steve Smith.
Cub Scouts (l-r) Cameron Race, Roger Mandeville and Tyler Richards sing carols to resident of Blair Manor in Enfield, along with the rest of Pack77's Den #1, on Dec. 11. Photos by Steve Smith.

Cub Scouts from Den 1 of Pack 77 in Ellington helped brighten the holiday spirits of Blair Manor residents in Enfield on Dec. 11. Pastori's restaurant provided its banquet room for the Scouts and their families to use as an art studio, where they created 120 holiday cards, each with their own personal touch. Then the Scouts and their families caravanned to Enfield to visit Blair Manor to hand-deliver the cards, which were overwhelmingly well-received.

“This is the best Christmas card I've gotten yet,” one of the residents said.

After the tidings of joy were delivered, the Scouts serenaded their new friends with carols, including “Frosty the Snowman,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and “We Wish You a Merry Christmas.”

“I think it teaches the boys what good will is all about,” said Pack leader John McTighe. “Scouts are taught to help other people and do their best. We spend a lot of time on those things, but this helps them learn what they actually mean.”

McTighe said the idea came from parents Kathy Richards and Tracy Thibert. “We were talking about how, for kids, Christmas is always about getting presents,” Richards said. “We bounced around a few ideas, and this just came together.”

Richards added that she contacted a few nursing homes, and found Blair Manor to have a good ratio between the number of residents and the number of cards the Scouts could likely produce. “They just welcomed us in,” she said, adding that the output of cards turned out to be a little better than expected, because the card-making party was even more of a family experience than originally planned.

“We made extra cards, just in case some of the residents had spouses or relatives, or if the nursing home staff knew of some other people who don't have a lot of family around,” Richards said. “Some of the kids were taking a little while to make the cards, so we had some of the parents help. Everyone kind of just chipped in.”

“They loved making the cards and had a lot of fun,” McTighe said.


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