Community Garden Space available to Putnam residents

By Denise Coffey - Staff Writer
Putnam - posted Mon., Apr. 29, 2013
There are 10 raised beds and plenty of land available in the Putnam Community Garden. Photo by Denise Coffey.
There are 10 raised beds and plenty of land available in the Putnam Community Garden. Photo by Denise Coffey.

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The ground has been tilled and soil samples taken at the Robert R. Johnston Community Garden in Putnam in preparation for a May 11 opening day. The garden features 10 raised beds, two handicapped accessible beds, and space for several other plots. According to Putnam Director of Economic Development Delpha Very, residents can determine the size of the garden they want when they apply for space.

The town has made the land available to residents with the help of an Urban Garden and Open Space grant administered through the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. The $20,000 grant has been used to construct a tool shed, install a water faucet, and purchase a rototiller, weed whacker and other tools. The shed will be open on hours yet to be determined, according to Very.

This will be the first full growing season at the garden. Rawson Materials donated soil and Killingly Vo-Ag students will donate their time to help novices. Very expects to have a bank of blueberry and raspberry bushes planted to provide a natural barrier along one side of the garden.

Sprucedale Gardens owner Paul Larson suggested that gardeners be wary of growing vining plants such as pumpkins, watermelon and cantaloupe

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“There are lots of things you could grow successfully,” Larson said. “It's decent soil.” He suggested string beans, carrots, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, lettuce, cabbage and broccoli. Larson also designed a seven-foot by nine-foot perennial garden that will include forsythia, lavender and other flowers.

“We can expand the garden at any time because it's municipally owned,” Very said.

Residents who are interested in growing their own vegetables in the community garden can contact Very at 860-963-6834 or delpha.very@putnamct.us. The cost is $20 for a raised bed and $15 for a ground plot.

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The ground has been tilled and soil samples taken at the Robert R. Johnston Community Garden in Putnam in preparation for a May 11 opening day. The garden features 10 raised beds, two handicapped accessible beds, and space for several other plots. According to Putnam Director of Economic Development Delpha Very, residents can determine the size of the garden they want when they apply for space.

The town has made the land available to residents with the help of an Urban Garden and Open Space grant administered through the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. The $20,000 grant has been used to construct a tool shed, install a water faucet, and purchase a rototiller, weed whacker and other tools. The shed will be open on hours yet to be determined, according to Very.

This will be the first full growing season at the garden. Rawson Materials donated soil and Killingly Vo-Ag students will donate their time to help novices. Very expects to have a bank of blueberry and raspberry bushes planted to provide a natural barrier along one side of the garden.

Sprucedale Gardens owner Paul Larson suggested that gardeners be wary of growing vining plants such as pumpkins, watermelon and cantaloupe because of the space they require. Cukes are an exception because they can be trained to grow on a trellis.

“There are lots of things you could grow successfully,” Larson said. “It's decent soil.” He suggested string beans, carrots, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, lettuce, cabbage and broccoli. Larson also designed a seven-foot by nine-foot perennial garden that will include forsythia, lavender and other flowers.

“We can expand the garden at any time because it's municipally owned,” Very said.

Residents who are interested in growing their own vegetables in the community garden can contact Very at 860-963-6834 or delpha.very@putnamct.us. The cost is $20 for a raised bed and $15 for a ground plot.

 

 


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