One Fund Run a hit at Glastonbury High School

By Steve Smith - Staff Writer
Glastonbury - posted Mon., Jun. 10, 2013
Glastonbury High School senior Liz Capreol (right) and friends Alyssa Nardi (left) and Lauren Kelly sit by the banner at the event they helped coordinate on June 7. Photos by Steve Smith.
Glastonbury High School senior Liz Capreol (right) and friends Alyssa Nardi (left) and Lauren Kelly sit by the banner at the event they helped coordinate on June 7. Photos by Steve Smith.

Several Glastonbury High School students stayed after school on June 7, all for a good cause. A group of students had created an event, known as the One Fund Run, soon after the Boston Marathon bombings, as a way to help the victims’ families, and the survivors who are now coping with injuries.

“Basically the day after everything happened, a bunch of students and I were e-mailing [GHS Assistant Principal] Dr. [Thomas] Neagle, saying that we had to do something about this,” said GHS senior Liz Capreol, who spearheaded the effort. “Every time something happens, our community wants to do something to help.”

Capreol explained that the idea grew into something marathon-themed, and the One Fund Run idea came into fruition. For a small entrance fee, students and teachers got a t-shirt (with a student-designed logo that combines the words “Glastonbury” and “Boston” creatively) which was also their entry pass for the event. Once inside the gymnasium, they were able to take part in relay races, or just walk or run the track at their leisure. Participants were encouraged to complete 30 laps, which equaled 2.6 miles, paying homage to the 26.2-mile length of a marathon.

Six teams competed in the relays, while many others participated in the other activities, including line-dancing, games, raffles and purchasing donated refreshments, with proceeds all going to One Fund Boston. While having fun, participants took note of those they were helping, as the announcer read the stories of several of the Boston victims and survivors.

Capreol said several members of the student council got involved with the planning of the event, as did the school’s cultural diversity clubs. “It’s just a lot of fun – hanging out and enjoying music,” she said. “It’s a pretty good turnout.”

“It’s an opportunity to do some work to help people, and get together after school, to enjoy music and food and have fun,” Neagle said, adding that the weather forcing the event indoors may have helped the cause, as there may have been fewer other competing activities going on.

Speaking about the marathon victims, Neagle said he had done some research and found that amputations are costly, at approximately $500,000, as are prosthetics - the most simple of which are at least $10,000, so the One Fund Boston cause is needed and a worthy one.


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