‘Creatures’ make visit to Kent Memorial Library

By Jennifer Coe - ReminderNews
Suffield - posted Mon., Jul. 1, 2013
Richard Roth, of The Creature Teachers, held the attention of this group of kids with his animal show. Here he holds Vinnie, a woodchuck. Photos by Jennifer Coe.
Richard Roth, of The Creature Teachers, held the attention of this group of kids with his animal show. Here he holds Vinnie, a woodchuck. Photos by Jennifer Coe.

Children sat cross-legged on the rug at the Kent Memorial Library on June 25, eagerly anticipating an animal presentation by The Creature Teachers, a family-owned business which specializes in animal education and rehabilitation. Richard Roth arrived with multiple cases and cages which contained animals from all parts of the world to share with the kids.

The first animal to be shown to the children was a friendly and quirky cockatoo named Elliott. Roth told the story of how he came to own Elliott. He received a phone call one day from a woman who said she was looking to donate “a wonderful” bird to Roth. Roth, knowledgeable about animals, was dubious, as he said that no one gets rid of a “wonderful” bird. But after visiting with the white and yellow bird, he decided he would like to adopt him. Several days later, Roth and his family were surprised to find out that Elliott has a irritating habit of following him and his wife around the house, constantly and squawking at them. Roth explained with a laugh that from that point on, Elliott was caged in an out-building with the other birds he owns.

Roth used this event as an opportunity to explain to the children why an animal should never be taken from the wild. All of his animals used in his presentations were either rehabilitated or raised from birth.

“Every animal out there has a job to do,” Roth said. He explained that birds, in fact, propagate 70 percent of seeds in the wild.

Roth then brought out an assortment of frogs, an opossum, a woodchuck and a blue-tongued skink, teaching the children facts about each one’s habitat and social behavior. The animal which got the biggest reaction from the children was a huge African bullfrog, which weighed 2 to 3 pounds. The frog sat on the presentation table as kids and parents looked on with simultaneous disgust and interest. Godzilla, as he is called, is a slow mover who Roth said eats mice when he can sink his fangs into them.

The presentation was one program being offered by the Children’s Department at Kent Memorial Library. To register for an event, call the library at 860-668-3896.


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