Stafford Resident Troopers Office reopens on Main Street

By Annie Gentile - ReminderNews
Stafford - posted Wed., Jul. 17, 2013
Stafford Resident Troopers office secretary Hope Frassinelli shows off Sgt. Thomas Duncan's new office. The entire building at 2 Main St. was revamped and the troopers and local police moved back July 15. Photo by Annie Gentile.
Stafford Resident Troopers office secretary Hope Frassinelli shows off Sgt. Thomas Duncan's new office. The entire building at 2 Main St. was revamped and the troopers and local police moved back July 15. Photo by Annie Gentile.

The Stafford Resident Troopers Office on Main Street is open for business again. After being relocated for several months for much-needed building repairs, the troopers moved back to their permanent location at 2 Main St. on July 15 from their temporary stay in the school complex on Levinthal Run.

“It’s good to be back. We moved in Monday and we’re open for business today [July 16],” said Sgt. Thomas Duncan.

Duncan said the problems at the Main Street location started about two years ago, when heavy rains flooded the building on two separate occasions. The carpet in the office became saturated and ruined, and the water also soaked through to the dirt basement below.

“Mold spores started to grow,” Duncan said, adding that employees started getting sick sometime between the two flooding incidents. In response, he said, they brought in an outside company to conduct some mold testing and it was found that the mold spore count was increasing. “We had to move out of the building in October of 2012, and then once they started looking at the building more closely, they also discovered asbestos,” Duncan said. “We had to come up with a strategy to deal with both the mold problem and the asbestos.”

After the move, the building went through a series of improvements, starting with the installation of a new storm drain outside the building to deal with heavy rain. A cement floor was installed in the basement, along with a sump pump. Roof repairs were made and a new interview room was built. A new and more efficient propane heating and air conditioning system were also installed, as the old oil-fired furnace was around 75 years old. “That should pay off in the long run,” said Duncan. Outside contractors also installed new sheetrock and painted the inside of the building. “Basically, the whole building has been revamped,” he said.

One of the reasons the work took as long as it did, Duncan said, was because much of the work was completed by town employees who had to concentrate on several other projects as well. Duncan said town employees installed a new fire alarm system for the entire building as well as a new electrical service and panel. “For the most part, no major work has been done on this building in a significant amount of time,” said Duncan. “We now have a generator in the building. We didn’t have one before. We now have a security system and a new data network for the state police radio and computer system.”

The Resident Troopers Office is home to four state troopers, two full-time local police, three part-time police and a secretary, Duncan said. He said they also allow probation officers to meet with clients in their building, as opposed to traveling to Vernon.

“We were in a nice building in the school complex, but everyone is thrilled to be back in a new work environment,” said Duncan. “We really need to be a presence on Main Street.”


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