Homer R. Peckham inducted to the Ellington Wall of Honor

By Lisa Stone - ReminderNews
Ellington - posted Thu., Sep. 12, 2013
Jamie Peckham, Nancy Traut, Judith Sizer, Norman Scheuy and Marianne Pitkat reunited for the ceremony inducting Homer R. Peckham to the Wall of Honor. Photo by Lisa Stone.
Jamie Peckham, Nancy Traut, Judith Sizer, Norman Scheuy and Marianne Pitkat reunited for the ceremony inducting Homer R. Peckham to the Wall of Honor. Photo by Lisa Stone.

Homer R. Peckham was named as the 2013 Ellington Wall of Honor recipient on Sept. 7 at Arbor Park. Peckham was recognized for all the activism in which he took part, as well as the many contributions he made to the community during his 90 years.

The Ellington Fire Department’s Honor Guard was present at the ceremony, standing tall and silent as the induction took place. The crowd consisted of friends and family of Peckham, as well as the First Selectman Maurice Blanchette.

Blanchette welcomed the spectators and began speaking about all the achievements Peckham had in his life. He was a devoted husband to his wife, Katherine, and a loving father to his two daughters, Jamie and Marianne. “Homer was a very polite activist,” said Blanchette. “He knew what had to be done, and he did it with grace and discipline. We have a great deal to thank him for. He was in many organizations. He was quiet and respectful. He was a truly exceptional activist.”

Peckham was the president for the Ellington Historical Society for two years. He was the treasurer as well as the director for the Ellington Cemetery Association.  In 1986, Peckham was the chairman for the Bicentennial Committee. He was also the chairman for Arbor Park as well. For 50 years, Peckham volunteered at the Ellington Congregational Church, doing whatever was asked of him.

“You really can’t talk about Dad without talking about Mom,” said Jamie Peckham. “Not only did they love each other, but they both really loved Ellington.  Mom would volunteer to do flowers for weddings or funerals that Dad was volunteering to help out with as well. Dad was the chairman of a couple of committees and Mom was the president of the Ellington Women’s Club. They inspired each other. Ellington meant so much to both of them.”

“The Peckham family and my family lived next to each other in a duplex on Prospect Street in 1947,” said Judith Sizer. “After a few years, both of our families moved to another duplex on Pinnacle Road.  We didn’t live in different homes until 1958. My dad, Norman Scheuy, and Homer Peckham were best friends. We all were. It was a great situation and we still stay in touch. Homer was an incredible man, as was the entire family.”

“People don’t get on the Wall of Honor just because they contribute to their community,” said Blanchette. “They need to be an outstanding humanitarian.  That is what Homer Peckham was. We were blessed to have him in Ellington.”


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