Lyman students show off knowledge at Ag. Expo

By Melanie Savage - Staff Writer
Lebanon - posted Tue., Oct. 8, 2013
Lyman Memorial High School sophomore Annalee Mears talks about her flock of laying hens. Photos by Melanie Savage.
Lyman Memorial High School sophomore Annalee Mears talks about her flock of laying hens. Photos by Melanie Savage.

Lyman Memorial High School sophomore Alex Jacobs volunteered at Tara Farm equine rescue in Coventry for her first year in the agricultural science program. “I love horses and I loved it,” she said. But Jacobs decided to switch her focus to the Youth Conservation Corps this year, where she got involved in work through Mystic Aquarium. “I want to do my career in marine mammals,” she explained.

Jacobs has primarily been involved with educating the public about ways to help protect the environment. “I absolutely love it,” she said. Her table at this year’s Agricultural Expo, held Oct. 2 at the school, featured photos of marine mammals and displays designed to teach. “Sea turtles eat jellyfish,” said Jacobs, taking hold of a small, transparent plastic bag. “This looks an awful lot like a jellyfish in the ocean, and a sea turtle might eat it,” continued Jacobs. “That would most likely kill the turtle.”

At the next table, Lyman senior Molly Stanavage stood next to her display, featuring aspects of honeybee keeping. Stanavage is the president of the Lebanon FFA chapter and a Colchester resident. The purpose of the Ag. Expo, she said, was to allow students to show off their projects and share progress that they’ve made over the course of the year. Students have quite a bit of leeway regarding topics, and this year’s expo featured subjects as diverse as mushroom cultivation, guide dogs, rabbits, goats, chickens, tractors, barrel racing, horse jumping and polo.

Stanavage said that she’d kept six honeybee hives, beginning in her freshman year. The first year her bees didn’t make it through the winter. “Because I was too much of a beginner to condition them well enough to make it through,” she said. Proper conditioning involves taking precautions that lead to the healthiest hive possible going into the winter months. This year, with knowledge gained through several years of experience, “I’m hopeful that my bees will make it through this winter,” said Stanavage.


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