Literacy Night held at Jack Jackter Intermediate School

By Merja H. Lehtinen - ReminderNews
Colchester - posted Tue., Nov. 12, 2013
The Boosters - grandfather Ed Gaffney (right) and PTO member Meghan Wildstein - sold creative t-shirts, one designed by former Jackter student Trebor Kuzcsyk when he was a fifth-grader last year. Photos by Merja H. Lehtinen.
The Boosters - grandfather Ed Gaffney (right) and PTO member Meghan Wildstein - sold creative t-shirts, one designed by former Jackter student Trebor Kuzcsyk when he was a fifth-grader last year. Photos by Merja H. Lehtinen.

From members of the student senate who greeted visitors at the door to children and parents listening to storyteller Carol Glynn in the gym, everyone involved seemed to be enjoying the fourth annual Literacy Night at Jack Jackter Intermediate School on Nov. 7.

Administrators, teachers, parents, grandparents and paraprofessionals - all led by Principal Deb Sandberg - created a night of learning, listening and reading, as well as craft and word games stations.

Popular children’s book authors Michael J. Daley and Jessie Haas signed books and spoke with children and parents about the stories they create. Daley wrote science-fiction books such as “Shanghaied to the Moon,” and Haas wrote several of the American Girl doll books about Saige’s story. Carli Navickas told Haas that her daughter is a fan. “She has all the books, so it was nice to find out you are here tonight,” said Navickas.

The Boosters – among them grandfather Ed Gaffney and PTO member Meghan Wildstein - sold creative t-shirts, one designed by former Jackter student Trebor Kuzcsyk when he was a fifth-grader last year.

Sue Urbowicz and “Sammy” offered a “Who Done It?” mystery station where a “crime scene” was set up for students to decipher. The clue to solve the mystery was “he has white in his clothing. His head is orange. The one who did it is lying down. Who did it?”  There were three dummies in the scene who could have been the perpetrator. Clues led observers to deduce who did the dastardly deed.

A Literacy Café offered snacks during the event, and there were displays of books that related to the food. For example, “If You Give a Moose a Muffin” was near the basket of muffins for sale.

For those students who wanted to read, there was an open poetry reading in the library. A child could select a passage and read to peers, parents and staff. Games and activities such as the Book Walk, Homophone Bingo, Poetry Writing and a Writers’ Garden kept guests entertained, and all sorts of books were for sale, encouraging the students to take their love of reading home with them.


Home
Let us know what you think!
Please be as specific as possible.
Include your name and email if you would like a response back.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
y
r
q
2
n
A
Enter the code without spaces and pay attention to upper/lower case.