Chanukah marked in local communities

By Steve Smith - Staff Writer
Tolland/Region - posted Wed., Dec. 4, 2013
Rabbi Yosef Wolvovsky, of the Chabad East of the River, lights the menorah on the Tolland Green on Dec. 2. Photos by Steve Smith.
Rabbi Yosef Wolvovsky, of the Chabad East of the River, lights the menorah on the Tolland Green on Dec. 2. Photos by Steve Smith.

Rabbi Yosef Wolvovsky marked the Chanukah holiday in several communities in the region, by lighting a large menorah in town greens (or other central locations) in towns including Tolland, Glastonbury and Ellington. Wolvovsky, who is the director of the Chabad East of the River, also known as the Benet Rothstein Chabad Jewish Center, said some of the lightings were better attended than others, but that really doesn’t matter.

“We get together a small crowd, and say ‘oh, we’re small,’ but our good deeds – our mitzvahs – are important. They have a ripple effect on our families and our communities,” he said.

Wolvovsky lit the sixth candle on the Tolland Green on Dec. 2. He said the significance of the number six is that it represents the six days it took for God to create the world. “The number six, or six days, represents creativity,” he said. “Day number six means to use those mitzvoh that we used up to now in a way that is constructive, and a way that builds. Candle number six is of building and of creation.”

Wolvovsky said he makes the “tour” of towns in the area, to spread the message of Chanukah. “That message is that no deed is insignificant,” he said. “We come to all the communities, whether they are large or small events, to bring people together in celebration, and so that we can commit to do more good and to make the world a better place.”

Having Chanukah coincide with Thanksgiving (something that won’t happen again for 79,000 years, although Thanksgiving will fall on Chanukah eve in 2070), Wolvovsky said, is entirely appropriate and benefited the Jewish celebration.

“It makes a difference in a positive way,” Wolvovsky said. “Chanukah is about thanks-giving. It’s about giving thanks to God for the miracles that he has performed to us. Living in this country, Thanksgiving is very appropriate, because the whole idea is to give thanks to God for the bounty of our country and for the freedoms of our country, mainly in this case religious freedom.”

For more information, visit www.chabader.com.


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