Windsor honors Martin Luther King, Jr.

By Jennifer Coe - ReminderNews
Windsor - posted Thu., Jan. 23, 2014
Brother and sister Michael and Angela presented the ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, originally given by Martin Luther King, Jr., at Windsor Town Hall on Jan. 20. Photos by Jennifer Coe.
Brother and sister Michael and Angela presented the ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, originally given by Martin Luther King, Jr., at Windsor Town Hall on Jan. 20. Photos by Jennifer Coe.

Each year, the Archer Memorial AME Zion Church provides the community with a stirring recognition of Martin Luther King, Jr. – a man known to so many to be a champion of civil rights and activist for humanitarian issues. Through speeches and songs, town leaders and members of the church were asked to pay tribute to King at Town Hall on Monday, Jan. 20.

Windsor Police Chief Kevin Searles spoke about how when he was growing up in the 1960s, he was exposed to strong-worded racism and bigotry. As a young man, he watched hero after hero die at the hands of assassins.

“Boom,” he said. “I just couldn’t believe it.” Searles’ reaction to King’s death made him question where his country was going. He was a senior in high school and had been asked to speak before his class at a memorial. “I was unable to talk,” he said. “I couldn’t believe that someone who had done so much for our country had been assassinated.” Many in the crowd nodded in agreement, remembering their own experiences.

Searles was followed by church member Monique Sanders. Sanders, an actress, recited a monologue in the role of a teenager, who is somewhat addicted to using her cell phone - all the time. Sanders depicted the girl’s frustration that she feels when adults assume she was up to no good because she was always looking at her phone. But Sanders’ character went on to talk about how she downloaded gossip and emails, yes, but she also read the news and became more aware of the world around her. “There’s a lot they are using phone for,” Sanders said later, “for information, for creativity, as an outlet. It has its positives, too.”

Sanders feels that adults assume kids are up to no good when they see them on their phones, perhaps needlessly. “Then it becomes this thing they do in a closet,” she said. “We don’t want kids to hide technology from us.”

After the ceremony honoring King, all the guests were invited to return to the Windsor Historical Society for refreshments and to participate in a conversation about social media.

The Historical Society often takes up what it calls “Timely Topics.” This year, WHS coordinated with Archer Memorial to host a discussion about social media.

Historical Society Executive Director Christine Ermenc said that the group gathered tackled some weighty subjects. “Some of the more interesting threads [of conversation] included how Martin Luther King would have used social media and how those that feared his message would have used social media to distort what he said,” she said. They also discussed whether or not Facebook pages truly are “out there” forever. In addition, Ermenc said they agreed on a general “call to people of all ages to think of ways to use social media for good, as well as for entertainment.”


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